MAIN GALLERY

 

Accreditation | Contact the Webmaster | FGCU Directory | An EO/AA/Diversity institution


© FGCU 3/8/2013 1:08:50 PM. This is an official FGCU web page.

Florida Gulf Coast University
10501 FGCU Blvd, South
Fort Myers, FL 33965-6565
(239) 590-1000 or (800) 590-3428

SAMANTHA WEISS

STOP & STARE

Senior Project APRIL 2016

No one person’s mind is the same as another, so there can be millions of interpretations of one single thing. Interpretations are based on the past experiences of each individual and are therefore more relatable and meaningful to the individual. Through these experiences, we subconsciously pick up on patterns throughout our existence that help us survive. When we come across a visual where there is no immediate discernable pattern or it appears to be confusing, our brains crave to find the pattern to restore back to homeostasis. With this in mind, I wanted to create works that involved both patterns and optical illusions that challenge the viewer’s perceptions on how he or she sees and processes a work.

I have always been curious about optical illusions and patterns for their visual appeal. The works show both complexity and simplicity all at once, and I find myself thinking more about these kinds of works that challenge my mind. With any work of art though, I like to find some type of meaning or symbolism that makes the work more relatable to myself. By doing this, I was always able to connect more with a work than by just the title, description, or other outside influence. Art is a form of humanistic expression, and even though everyone has his or her own opinions and ideas about a work, art is a universal language that connects us all. This idea of making connections is what Stop & Stare is all about; associating something physically there in front of you to something abstract, such as thoughts, feelings, and/or memories. I find the more challenging the work is to relate to myself, the more I think about the work until a connection is made. Once a connection is made, in my eyes, a work is complete.

All of my works started with a base design or pattern that was repeated throughout the whole work. After the base patterns were set, each of my three works were distorted in some way by manipulating multiple layers of the same design on top of each other and adding inverted layers to create color contrasts that made the works pop. The works were created digitally through Photoshop and are printed on foam core boards.